Mobile Water Treatment Systems – A General Overview

In times of crisis or emergency, the water supply may be severely damaged or contaminated.  This will often leave the people affected without safe water to drink.  However, there is a solution to this.  Mobile water treatment systems are often used to provide a safe, effective way to get clean drinking water to those who need it the most.  The entire system is designed to be efficient and small enough to load onto a trailer.  Once on the trailer, the system can be transported easily to where clean drinking water is needed.

Most mobile water treatment systems can produce 300 gallons per minute of clean drinking water.  Drinking water, while the most common use for such systems, is not the only use, as we’ll see shortly.  The systems are often automated, so there is very little need for human interaction.  There are several basic types of systems, and each one is used for a specific purpose.  Mobile drinking water treatment systems are the most common, using membrane filtration to produce quick emergency drinking water.  Mobile wastewater treatment systems can be used to augment existing systems, or provide temporary primary treatment.  They are usually ultrafiltration systems, although membrane bioreactor systems can be used as well.
The third most common mobile water treatment system is mobile process water.  This type of system creates potable drinking water and water used for industrial purposes, like feed for crops and animals.  This system can be used in places where farming is common, yet clean water is hard to come by.  A fourth system is mobile reverse osmosis.  Much like the mobile wastewater system, reverse osmosis can be used to augment or temporarily replace a reverse osmosis water purification system.  Some emergency reverse osmosis systems are capable of producing 600 gallons of potable water per minute.
Mobile water treatment systems can be used for various purposes, but the common goal remains clear.  The objective is to provide emergency water where necessary, and a secondary purpose is to act as support or augment an existing process, such as if a plant has to work over capacity temporarily.  Because of their mobility and high gallon-per-minute rate, these systems can provide water to a large area quickly and easily.  The mobile systems use a plethora of filtration methods, such as ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, and microfiltration.  They aren’t productive enough to flat out replace an entire plant, but they will get the job done if needed for a short period of time.

In times of crisis or emergency, the water supply may be severely damaged or contaminated.  This will often leave the people affected without safe water to drink.  However, there is a solution to this.  Mobile water treatment systems are often used to provide a safe, effective way to get clean drinking water to those who need it the most.  The entire system is designed to be efficient and small enough to load onto a trailer.  Once on the trailer, the system can be transported easily to where clean drinking water is needed.Most mobile water treatment systems can produce 300 gallons per minute of clean drinking water.  Drinking water, while the most common use for such systems, is not the only use, as we’ll see shortly.  The systems are often automated, so there is very little need for human interaction.  There are several basic types of systems, and each one is used for a specific purpose.  Mobile drinking water treatment systems are the most common, using membrane filtration to produce quick emergency drinking water.  Mobile wastewater treatment systems can be used to augment existing systems, or provide temporary primary treatment.  They are usually ultrafiltration systems, although membrane bioreactor systems can be used as well.The third most common mobile water treatment system is mobile process water.  This type of system creates potable drinking water and water used for industrial purposes, like feed for crops and animals.  This system can be used in places where farming is common, yet clean water is hard to come by.  A fourth system is mobile reverse osmosis.  Much like the mobile wastewater system, reverse osmosis can be used to augment or temporarily replace a reverse osmosis water purification system.  Some emergency reverse osmosis systems are capable of producing 600 gallons of potable water per minute.Mobile water treatment systems can be used for various purposes, but the common goal remains clear.  The objective is to provide emergency water where necessary, and a secondary purpose is to act as support or augment an existing process, such as if a plant has to work over capacity temporarily.  Because of their mobility and high gallon-per-minute rate, these systems can provide water to a large area quickly and easily.  The mobile systems use a plethora of filtration methods, such as ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, and microfiltration.  They aren’t productive enough to flat out replace an entire plant, but they will get the job done if needed for a short period of time.

No related posts.

Leave a Reply